click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
was the role of guns in the militia or these requirements that we talk about? >> guest: george washington didn't think a lot of the militia. he growled about a lot of times but also made some remarks that aloud how the militia was a useful thing to have. they could have built the continental army with the existence of the militia and people that have been in the militia and more importantly the volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was the key. >> host: so people were using these on the frontier protecting the indians, native americans, hunting certainly, and then in the colony's some sense of responsibility for the common good. >> guest: right. the common law right to have the firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of these? >> guest: local commanders, towns. later on became more broadbased, but as tensions and hostility is mounted between the british authorities and the colonists in approach to the revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders of the time has an advantage that we americans knew how to use firear
are talked about? >> guest: george washington didn't think a whole lot of the militia. he pressed about it at times, but he also had made remarks that allowed off the militia was a useful thing to have feared it could have built the continental army that the existence of the militias and people who would than in militias and more importantly volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms and that was key. >> host: said people were using it on the frontier, protections against the native americans, hunting certainly am in the colonies, some sense of responsibility for the common good. as to exactly. the common moderate to have and use firearms became the pacific duty to use them and called upon. >> host: who was in charge of malicious? >> guest: local commander towns very often have them, new england certainly. later on they became more broadly based. but as tensions and hostilities mounted between the british authorities in the colonists and the approach to the revolutionary war, he was seen by many of the leaders at the time as an advantage that we americans knew how to use firearm
or requirements that we talked about? >> guest: well, george washington didn't think a lot of the militia. he grouched about it at times, but he also made remarks that allowed how the militia was a useful thing to have and couldn't have bill the army without the existence of the militia and people in the militias, and more importantly, volunteers and others who knew how to use firearms, and that was key. >> host: so people used these on the frontier, protection against the indians, native americans, hunting certainly, and then during the colonies, some sense of responsibility for the common good. >> guest: exactly. the right, the common law right to have and use firearms came with a civic duty to use them when called upon. >> host: who was in charge of the militias? >> guest: well, local commanders, towns had them, in new england certainly, and later on, they became more broadly based, but as tensions and hostilities mounted between the british authorities and the colonists, the approach to revolutionary war, it was seen by many of the leaders at the time as an advantage that we americans kne
a script. it didn't work for me, but 10 years later it haunted me that story in washington and he is still teaching a class when i came back. we decided to go ahead and do it.mandari about wallace and the bump. that one hour turned into ultimately -- our eyes are bigger than our stomachs and we tried a 12 hour national security state story from the 1940s to now and it actually started in 1900 with the philippine american war but the spanish-american war and then in 2012, we started 1940 in the series. the book two years after our series we decided hey this is getting very serious and we know i'm going to be called on this because of my back round in making movies. people will say this is part fiction and part fantasy that we decided to go ahead and go with this book. peter took over the book. i was running the series, the film and we were cross fading all the time and checking each other constantly but it took about four and a half or five years now and that is where we are today. >> host: go ahead. >> guest: we have been friends for that whole period since 1996 and then we decided we were
weekend.we have mirijam who is in washington. -- while we can. >>guest: how are you? >>caller: just fine. >>guest: did you get this amazing value $9.98 to get 36 huggable hangers home and the holiday bag? >>caller: yes i did, it is for me i am not giving any of it away. >>guest: [laughter] >>caller: i need to organize my closet. >>guest: i am missing something this is the holiday season mirijam! [laughter] that is a problem when a product is this good you do not want to give it up. >>caller: you do not. i already started huggable hangers in my closet i organize the whole thing and got the purple.i got the purple again and i cannot tell you how happy it makes me to look at my closet. >>guest: it is. >>host: it makes your day when you go to your closet you are more organized. do you find you have a lot more room because the hangers take up so much less space? >>caller: absolutely and i love nothing falls off! i have seen other types of this hanger yours of the best because they are very sturdy. >>guest: thank you. there is a science to them in the imitators i canno
to washington, and the senate starts to debate the ratification of this and the only nature of the obstacle arises jefferson himself lead him to believe that the federal government did not have the power to acquire a territory. and he starts to hem and haw say we need a constitutional amendment to give the government the power. napoleon back in france had overthrown the government. he was not exactly -- >> host: constitution nap. >> guest: yeah. not repressed by the argument. he started make noises saying i'm going revoke the treaty. madison, our baseline alternative comes to jefferson. -- >> host: the secretary of state. >> guest: right. closest friend. secretary of state in the room for every negotiation. he said you can't do this anymore. you have to agree and yield it's too big an turn to let your sphrict view. he agrees and he back down. they make purchase. jefferson displays a great deal of skill. the negotiation he choose monroe, absolutely the right person. he gets through the senate, successfully, manages all the things. so he displays flexibility, but think about flexible because
asked stotland to send the top general to washington in nabf 42 and in june of 40 to the issue a public statement saying we are going to open up the second front before the end of the war before the end of the year in 1942. we promised that publicly. and yet the open up in june of 44. that's partly because the british refused to go along with this and that the british get involved in the periphery in northern africa. they are serious but they didn't open up the second front with the united states brought instead basically to defend the provision higher. >> how does this link to the cold war? >> there's been to the mistrust between the soviets beginning during the war treatise of the seeds of the cold war are visible during the war. there are certain tensions of course because the fact that they delayed the second front know that the soviets had on their own largely defeated the germans after stalin and rather what pushing it across central europe and eastern europe moving towards berlin and they lost the mission and there's also a diplomatic initiative at that point and so the surgeon d
findings and experience with president of washington, d.c.'s hospital richard davis i'm judd davis here to say what hospitals won't tell you and how transparency can revolutionize so welcome your an expert in the field and i know that you've been a focus on for a while but the reason you decided to write the book and some of your findings. >> too many drivers. patients often times tell me when they come to the hospital if you like they're walking in the blind. there is a giant system why did you choose to come to this hospital over my career i've gotten answers like the parking here is good. we can do better than that. this is of the u.s. economy and competition seems to be the long will and patience are frustrated. the other reason i read the book is that doctors are getting crushed right now. they have declining medicare payments, increasing overhead hospitals have more expenses, malpractice rates are going up and the burnout rate is 46%. doctors are getting crushed right now and i felt like we needed a voice out there that it's okay to talk to each other public. >> host: you make the
practitioners. discuss the findings and experience with president of washington d.c.'s sibley hospital, richard davis. >> hi, i'm cheap davis and i'm here today with marty makary, author of "unaccountable: what hospitals won't tell you and how transparency can revolutionize health care." so welcome. >> guest: good to be with you. >> host: you are an expert in this field. tell us about the reasons that you decided to write the book and some of your findings. >> guest: well, two main drivers led me to write the book. number one, patients often tell me when they come to the hospital they feel like they're walking in blind. there's a strike system they don't know how to evaluate. when he asked my patients, why did you choose this hospital, over my career i've gotten answers like the perky near as good. we can do better than that. this is one fifth of the u.s. economy and competition seems to be at the wrong level impatiens are frustrated. the other reason i wrote the book is doctors are getting crushed right now. they've got declining medicare payments come increasing overhead. hospitals have more
to send molotov, a top general to washington in may i've '42, and june of '42 the united states said we are going to enup a second front before the end of the year in 1942. we promised that publicly and yet we don't open the second front until underof '44 and that's bass the british refused to go along with this and the united states and the british get involved in what marshall called periphery pecking in northern africa. marshall and eisenhower were serious. >> how did this lead to the cold war? >> because it led to a lot of mistrust between the united states and the soviets beginning -- the seeds of the colored war are visible during the war. and certain tension because the fact there was a second front, meant that the soviets had on their own to see that the german s -- were pushing across central europe and moving toward berlin, so we lost the military mission and on to diplomatic so there are doles being made between churchill and stalin of -- >> dividing up -- >> yeah, the british will get 90% of greece. the russians get 90% of bulgaria, and hungary, and divide it up that way. it
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)